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The Cardinal Times

Online Edition of The Cardinal Times

The Cardinal Times

Online Edition of The Cardinal Times

The Cardinal Times

Students struggle to balance jobs and school

 Students with part-time jobs struggle to find the balance between schoolwork and working part time.
Meagan Parke
Students with part-time jobs struggle to find the balance between schoolwork and working part time.

It can be a challenge for students who have jobs to balance their work with their lives and their education. Students who can limit the hours per week they work, often have a higher chance of succeeding in school. 

Currently, the state of Oregon limits work hours for 16 and 17 year olds to 44 hours per week all year round while 14 and 15 year olds are limited to 18 hours of work during the school year. 

A study by the University of Washington found that when high school students work more than 20 hours a week, their grades suffer. Lincoln’s Career Coordinator, Shannon Fasold, agrees.

“Research has shown that students do better [at school] when they [are] working up to a certain number of hours, so I personally think between 10 and 15 [hours] is kind of the sweet spot,” said Fasold.

Junior Ella Spangler works part time at Bamboo Sushi. She chooses to help balance her education and employment by only working a couple of days during the week, working in total around 5-10 hours per week.

“[It] hasn’t been that difficult [to balance work and school] but I would say I usually work Wednesdays directly after school so if I have a lot to do I usually stay up later,” said Spangler.

Many students work to better their future, rounding out their college applications or resumes. Some students, however, must work more hours in order to help support their families, help pay for their own expenses or many other reasons. 

“I think sometimes people don’t give themselves credit for the fact that a paid job is an activity and it is an excellent activity especially for students who like to contribute for their own expenses. I would say that [colleges] think of it highly,” said Fasold.

Yearly, students are required to be in class for 990 hours in grades 9-11, seniors needing a required seat time of 966 hours. These extensive hours of education can make having, as well as finding a job difficult. Problems arise when one begins to put a job before getting schoolwork done. This struggle finding balance can also lead to self esteem issues as students’ grades drop. 

Fasold talks about the effect on students who have too much on their plate.

“[When students procrastinate], they have to work and then they call in sick to work because they’re behind. It’s kind of this vicious cycle that ends up making them feel like they’re no good, even though they are, but they’ve dug themselves into a pit,” said Fasold. 

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About the Contributors
Meagan Parke, Reporter
Meagan is a junior this year. She is excited to learn more about reporting and meet new people, and loves podcasting.
Contact by emailing [email protected] and put the reporter's name in the subject line.
Leila Holte, Reporter
Leila is a junior this year. She is really excited to get to know everyone on the staff, and to be a part of something that is important and central to the Lincoln community. She loves writing reviews and other opinion pieces. Mostly, she loves getting to know other people and hearing their stories and opinions.
Contact by emailing [email protected] and put the reporter's name in the subject line.

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