Beloved teacher and coach Pablo Dipascuale departs from Lincoln

Teacher+and+coach+Pablo+Dipascuale+%28right%29+has+departed+from+Lincoln+to+pursue+a+master%E2%80%99s+degree+at+a+university+in+Buenos+Aires%2C+Argentina.+

Jon Rhodes

Teacher and coach Pablo Dipascuale (right) has departed from Lincoln to pursue a master’s degree at a university in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Skylar DeBose and Henry Reuland

Going back to South America to pursue a master’s degree in literature was something that Lincoln’s Spanish and Freshman Leadership and Inquiry (FLI) teacher Pablo Dipascuale always considered. However, it was during the COVID-19 lockdown that he decided to seriously pursue that goal.

“During COVID, I think a lot of us spent time rethinking our lives, and I decided for myself that I [had to] make this move,” Dipascuale said.

Dipascuale was accepted into the master’s program at the University of Buenos Aires, the largest university in Argentina. Since Argentina’s summer is our winter, the school year starts in February, making the end of the first semester at Lincoln an ideal time for Dipascuale to leave. 

Not only was Dipascuale an integral member of the Spanish teaching department at Lincoln, he was a coach of the men’s varsity soccer team for seven years, and the head coach for five seasons. Holding the dual roles as a teacher and coach allowed Dipascuale to connect with students through both positions. 

“I loved being a teacher-coach […] and being involved with young people’s academic and athletic experiences,” he said.

Dipascuale’s commitment to helping his students and players had an impact on junior Quincy Lea, who plays on Lincoln’s varsity soccer team. 

“I think Dipascuale gave us a lot outside of the pitch… and I think that meant a lot to the player,” Lea said.

Dipascuale said he will miss the positive mentality and player commitment that the soccer program upholds. Everyone on a high school team comes together to make something special.

“I’m huge on camaraderie and huge on being all in, and in the high school season you get that,” Dipascuale said. “It’s actually weird if [a player] isn’t at practice, and I just like that so much. So I will miss that for sure.”

Lea feels that Dipascuale helped support the program in a variety of ways. 

“I really liked how Coach Dipascuale made our team super competitive,” Lea said. “His way of organizing the practices so that our drills were all connected and made sense and related to the game made it so that we got a lot better very fast.” 

Dipascuale has some special memories of the soccer program that will always stick with him.

“Homemade team lunches and celebrating seniors is always going to be a nice memory. It’s all the little extra social thing, like the bus rides, that are a highlight for me,” he said.

Although it may be the little things that will stick out to Dipascuale, he also helped lead the team to many significant successes in his years of leadership in the soccer program.

“Winning the [Final Four at the Park] at Providence Park in the spring of last year will be very memorable just because of all the crap we went through. We really had to persevere to end on such a high note,” Dipascuale said. “We also did win a State Championship in 2015, which will always be a nice memory.” 

Dipascuale hopes that the players he has coached will continue with their soccer careers, even after he is gone. 

“My hope is that the boys I have coached continue to play the beautiful game and continue to develop the game. I hope I see them giving back by coaching [in the future] as well,” Dipascuale said.

Members of the Lincoln community are going to miss the presence of Dipascuale and his contributions as a teacher and coach. Students, players and peers wish him the best. 

“I hope Dipascuale has a very successful time going back to school. I hope that he meets back up with his family, and that he enjoys the nicer weather down in South America,” said Lea. “All the best wishes.”  

Dipascuale had a final message to give to the Lincoln soccer community.

“Thank you. It never felt like a job, so I’m just grateful,” he said. “Follow your interests because then [wherever you end up] will never seem like a job.”