Profile: Brad Subramaniam

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Tara Subramaniam

Brad Subramaniam

By: Tara Subramaniam

When many high schoolers imagine college, they think of moving away from home, having more freedom and they dread the increased pressure to succeed. Brad Subramaniam used to be one of these high schoolers. Now he is a college student at the University of Chicago.

Subramaniam is starting his third year of college, is majoring in economics, and is a Lincoln graduate. He is involved in many after school activities along with his schoolwork, such as writing for the Chicago Maroon, playing water polo and participating in speech and debate. Subramaniam has to manage all of these on top of classes.

“It can be difficult to manage at first,” says Subramaniam. “Oftentimes extracurriculars became a back burner and I had to put them to the side to focus on classes. I think you should always try to push yourself to go to clubs because oftentimes you might be tired at the end of the day and might not want to go to the club, but it pays off if you have a good club to go to.”

Many high schoolers might go into college expecting great new changes. Subramaniam thinks that the biggest difference between high school and college is the “freedom to do whatever you want—go to class, do homework, study, play games, etc.

“You have to be responsible for your own time and manage it well,” says Subramaniam. When going to college, many find themselves in a place where they don’t know anyone. Subramaniam suggests to “find clubs you really enjoy with a good group of people you can make friends with. Also, don’t be afraid to reach out to people in classes or in your dorm, because oftentimes people are looking for friends just like you are. Greek life is also a good idea.”

If Subramaniam could go back to his high school years, he says he would make a change.

“I wish I spent more time hanging out with people outside of school. I spent most of high school either in debate or studying at home, but I often didn’t have enough time to go hang out with people doing fun activities.”